Fall 2010

2010 - 2011 Courses - Fall Semester

Registration for Fall 2010 is Closed

  • Fall 2010 Early Registration: Apr. 12–23, 2010
  • Fall 2010 General Registration: Aug. 23–Sept. 3, 2010

Early Registration is strongly advised.

Starr King Tuition and Course Fees.

Summer (August) 2010 intensives are listed on Summer 2010 Courses.

Students enrolled in a degree program at Starr King School (or any other Graduate Theological Union school) should follow the registration processes outlined by their school’s registrar.  Starr King’s processes are listed in the Starr King Student Handbook (password required to view).

To register for a course if you are not in a degree program at Starr King or the GTU, please see "How to Register for a Starr King Course".

 

Fall 2010 Online and Residential Courses

Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

Online Courses 

Introduction to Liberal Religious Education
Helen Bishop
Online
This online seminar course provides a broad introduction to the theory and practice of liberal religious education, with an emphasis on Unitarian Universalist congregations. Topics include philosophy of UU religious education, teaching and learning, developmental theories, the congregation as an educating community, social justice visions for religious education, current approaches and innovations in religious education for all ages, collegial relationships and professional standards for religious educators, and curriculum resources. The course draws from on one by the same name developed by Betty Jo Middleton, Roberta M. Nelson, Eugene B. Navias, and Judith Mannheim with support from a grant by the St. Lawrence Foundation. / Dr. Helen Bishop holds an Ed.D in organizational leadership and has an extensive background working with Unitarian Universalist congregations, districts and affiliated organizations. She has designed, developed and taught online courses related to all aspects of lay leadership and congregational studies, including a pilot project for Unitarian Universalist lay leaders. She also served as director of The Mountain Learning Center for Leadership in Highlands, N.C., and as District Executive for Congregational Services for the UUA’s Central Midwest District. She received the Angus MacLean Award for Service to Religious Education in October, 2008.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
ED-8465          3 Units       
Minimum 8       Limit 15            Pin Required: Yes  
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

UU Journey Toward Wholeness
Sean Parker Dennison
Online
The Unitarian Universalist Association has been on the Journey Toward Wholeness since delegates at the 1997 General Assembly created a committee to monitor and assess the “transformation of the UUA into an authentically anti-racist, anti-oppressive, multicultural association.” In this class we will explore the JTW initiative, its successes and failures. We will pay special attention to the theo/alogical aspects of the program itself and the debates surrounding it. What is the theological point of our journey? What is our Unitarian Universalist vision of “wholeness”? How might we ground the work of countering oppression in UU sources and history? How might we inspire our predominantly white, privileged congregations to own the necessity, importance and transformative possibility of this work? / The Rev. Sean Parker Dennison has been a Unitarian Universalist minister since 2000. He is a graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry and currently serves as Vice President of the Board of Trustees. Sean is passionate about writing, educating to counter oppressions and create just and sustainable communities, computers and emerging online communities, and his family.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
EDRS-8460      3 Units
Minimum 8       Limit 18            Pin Required: Yes
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

Transcendentalism: Religion and Social Action
Rudra Dundzila

Online
Transcendentalism featured a flowering of idealism among a small community of New England Unitarian intellectuals, educators, writers, and reformers. They embraced spirituality, social responsibility, and ethical pluralism. Their ideas and actions stretched beyond European thought and dared to speak new truths that many of their contemporaries found both disturbing and revolutionary. The course will focus on Transcendentalist thought, experiments, social reform, and social action. / Dr. Vilius Rudra Dundzila is a Unitarian Universalist minister in preliminary fellowship and Professor of Humanities and Comparative Religion for Harry S. Truman College (City Colleges of Chicago). He has conducted spiritual direction, groups, and retreats for Gay men. He currently serves as the director of the Illinois Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
HSST-8430      3 Units
Minimum 5       Limit 20            Pin Required: Yes
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

View a Video Introduction by the Professor to Transcendentalism: Religion and Social Action.

Spiritual Practice for These Times
Chris Fry

Online
This is not a time to live without a practice. . . . Whether we reach this inner state of recognized divinity through prayer, meditation, dancing, swimming, walking, feeding the hungry or enriching the impoverished is immaterial. We will be doubly bereft without some form of practice that connects us, in a caring way, to what begins to feel like a dissolving world. ~Alice Walker  This year-long, online course will support students in developing or strengthening their spiritual practice in order to meet the challenges of life and ministry in these times. The class will be experiential and multi-religious, drawing on the wisdom and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism, as well as science and deep ecology. Fall semester will focus inward on meditation, gratitude and sabbath-keeping. Spring semester will focus outward on compassion, kindness and service. Taken together, these ancient, intersecting practices will assist students in finding a rhythm of being and doing ~ in their personal lives and their ministries ~ that is healthy, joyful and sustainable. It is expected that students will take both semesters. / The Rev. Chris Fry is a grateful graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry (‘96). An Adjunct Faculty member for more than five years, Chris has taught courses on poetry, illness and pastoral care; forgiveness; compassion and moral repair; and religious education. She offers “Write for Health” groups and spiritual direction, coordinates her church’s small group ministry, and is active in an interfaith shelter program in her hometown of Davis, CA. Her daughter, Esumi, was born during Chris’ second year at SKSM and is now a high school junior. Her husband, Isao Fujimoto, is a community organizer and professor at UC Davis.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
SPFT-8400       1.5 Units
Minimum 5       Limit 16            Pin Required: Yes
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

Unitarian Universalist History
Susan Ritchie
Online

The course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We move on to trace the theological and then institutional emergence of Unitarianism out of the Radical Reformation. The Unitarian churches in Poland, Transylvania, and England will be considered in detail with attention to issues of sameness and difference in their development and declines. Special focus will be given to the relationship of these communities to their Jewish and Islamic contemporaries. We will also look at the universalism of 18th century England, and the current state of Unitarianism in Europe. Then we cross the ocean to examine the emergence of Unitarianism from developments within Puritan Congregationalism. We explore the uniquely North American institution of Universalism as response to the same cultural setting. Next: the major themes and developments of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism (perhaps the most misunderstood aspect of Unitarian/Universalist history). Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances. / The Rev. Dr. Susan Ritchie has served as the minister of the North Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Lewis Center, Ohio since September of 1996. During that time, the congregation has more than doubled in size, purchased not only its first building but a religious education center, and added three professional staff positions. Ritchie is published widely on the topic of Unitarian Universalist history and identity, and also religious cultural studies. Her research demonstrating religious toleration to be an outgrowth of Islamic-Unitarian cultural exchange has been published in the Journal of Unitarian Universalist History, the Journal of the Zaytuna Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies, and has been republished in Turkish. Ritchie’s work on “The Promise of Postmodernism for Unitarian Universalist Theology” was published by the Journal of Liberal Religion, and was also translated into Hungarian.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
HSFT-8422      3 Units
Minimum 8       Limit 26            Pin Required: Yes
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

View a Video Introduction by the Professor to Unitarian Universalist History.

Dynamic Youth Ministry
Megan Dowdell &  Betty Jeanne Rueters-Ward
Online

This lively and interactive course grounds participants in philosophical, psychological, programmatic, ethical and theological aspects of youth ministry. Geared particularly toward Unitarian Universalists, this course seeks to embody a vision of youth ministry that is a vibrant, robust, and flexible part of every congregation. Topics of instruction include leadership and spiritual development, professional support for youth advisors, denominational polity, adolescent life issues, building intergenerational community, and a critical analysis of different models of youth ministry and programming. Recommended for all religious leaders, both new and old to youth ministry.
EDFT 8462   3 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 25  Pin Required: No
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

View a video introduction to Dynamic Youth Ministry:

Dynamic Youth Ministry from Starr King Acad Affairs on Vimeo.

 

Buddhist Traditions of South Asia
Lisa Grumbach

Online
Introduces the Buddhist traditions as they originated in India and develop throughout South and Southeast Asia. First half of the required year long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Usually offered each fall semester. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8151     3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

History of Shin Buddhist Tradition
Galen Amstutz

Online
Devotion to Amitabha and Amitayus Buddhas originates in medieval India, and is an integral part of Mahayana religious culture. Today, such devotional practice forms one of the most popular forms of Buddhism, and is found in Tibet, China, Korea, Vietnam, Japan and the West. Course topics include the textual sources, major figures, and key institutions. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper.
HRHS 8350    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 23–September 3

Topics in Buddhist Thought: Women, Family, Dharma
Lisa Grumbach

Online
This course challenges several generalized notions about Buddhism (e.g., that it is largely male, monastic, and requires the practice of individual meditation) by examining the roles women have played in the development and spread of Buddhism and by looking at the family as the locus of practice. Women in the history of Buddhism will be a focus of the course, but we will also examine men’s issues as well as children and the Dharma. Topics will include women’s roles in the formation and continued success of Buddhism; the relationships of nuns/monks to their families; the role of marriage in Buddhist “monasticism”; gender symbolism and gender-shifting; and practice within the family. Prerequisites: Assumes some knowledge of Buddhism. Course Format: Online “lecture” and online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRPH-8455     3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

Residential Courses

Monday 

Writing the Rites:  Liturgy and the Church Year
Mondays, 9:40am - 12:30pm
Michelle Favreault
This course will provide religious leaders with tools to create meaningful, multi-vocal worship in the UU congregational setting.  In class and in the community we will be creating and leading traditional and transformational worship for people at all ages and stages. Students will gain and understanding of the psychology and spirituality of ritual and liturgical forms within an historic context.  In addition to the Sunday service, we’ll create a calendar and write ceremonial rites to prepare for the leadership of weddings, memorials and other special religious occasions.
View the course syllabus and required reading list (pdf format).
LS 4309   3 Units
Minimum 3     Limit 15  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

Poverty Scholarship 101: Challenging Academia, Media, Research and Service
Mondays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Lisa Gray-Garcia
The worlds of academia, research, media and service provision have a rigid notion of who should be heard, what is a scholar and what is considered a valid form of data collection, media production, service provision and research. In this section, the poverty, race, disability, youth, migrant and indigenous scholars challenge the rigid concept of the canon, of scholarship itself and who should be heard and recognized. Through interactive reading, poetry, action, talk-story, protest, art and theatre students will redefine media in real time and be lead through new models of cross-class, cross-racial, intergenerational teaching, legislating, planning and art-making.  Class will be taught by poverty, race, disability, youth, and migrant scholars from the Race, Poverty and  Media Justice Institute at Poor Magazine.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
HRCE 4030  3 Units
Minimum 3     Limit 30  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Divine Shakti
Mondays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Sarla Santwani
*CANCELED*

‘Shakti’ (divine cosmic energy) is a term denoting female divinity of Hinduism. The ‘Shakti cult’ is a unique feature of Hinduism. This course aims at leading the students through the realm of Hindu Goddesses. ‘Shakti’ is more than a fertility Goddess. She presides over war (Durga), knowledge (Saraswati), prosperity (Lakshmi), eroticism (radha) and even destruction (Kali). The course will focus on topics such as Goddesses as archetypes and role models as well as feminist issues such as women’s rights, status, and empowerment in the context of ‘Shakti Cult.’ An audio-visual immersion into worships, festivals, and pilgrimages of Goddesses is included. This course is being taught by a Starr King Teaching Fellow.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
HR 4206   3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 20  Pin Required: No
Reading Room
*CANCELED*

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 

Tuesday 

Rethinking Holy Land(s)
Tuesdays, 9:40am - 12:30pm
Carmen Lansdowne
This course will engage students in religious leadership (whether called to congregational leadership or other vocations) to look at the spacialization of theology at the intersection of faith, politics, and land. What does it mean for marginalized peoples whose lands are appropriated by the state to be a people of faith and to relate to the dominant society in their contexts. Course content will begin with my own experience as a “Canadian-born American Indian” and my experience in peace advocacy for Israel-Palestine, but students will be encouraged to bring other contexts into our inquiry together. Multifaith participation is encouraged.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
STRS 4237 3 Units
Minimum 3     Limit 25  Pin Required: Yes
Reading Room

Dr. Howard Thurman - The Search for Common Ground in the 21st Century
Tuesdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Dorsey Blake
Considered a 20th Century prophet by historian Lerone Bennett, Dr. Howard Thurman created a body of spiritual insights exploring the relation between mysticism and social action.  This course will focus on comprehending the ideal of community as expressed through the thought and ministry of Dr. Howard Thurman. A goal of this course will be the discernment of evidence of oneness across racial, sexual, cultural, religious, and national boundaries. A crucial objective will be the embracing of spiritual discipline as an essential method for engaging the search for common ground in the 21st Century.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
RSSP 4568 3 Units
Minimum:1  Limit: 20  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

Apocalypse Now
Tuesdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Kurt Kuhwald
An exploratory course grounded in current studies theorizing about the possible/probable collapse of 21st century civilization.  Reference to ancient texts as well as the use of depth psychologies and transformational strategies of recent times will inform our work.  Two dynamics characterize our times: That we could lose it all; and that there are two powerful opposing global forces at play—regeneration/revolution and destruction.  In light of that reality, our goal will be to lay the groundwork for a post civilization consciousness that is rooted in thea/ological/cosmological depth, activist empowerment for the development of collective survival strategies and personal transformation.
Read the complete narrative description of this course (pdf format) by the professor.
View the course syllabus and required reading list (pdf format).
CEPS 4960 3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 25  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Wednesday 

ECO/Threshold Seminar
Wednesdays, 9:40am - 12:30pm, plus weekly ECO Workshop, Wednesdays, 2:10 – 5:00 pm
Rebecca Ann Parker et al 
This foundational seminar, required of all Starr King M.Div. and MASC students during their first fall semester in residence, will introduce ministry and religious leadership as vocations that "counter oppressions and create just and sustainable communities" (ECO for short). Participants will engage with the threshold areas in which Starr King students must achieve competency before graduation,  and will  learn and practice tools of social and cultural analysis, self-critical analysis, theological reflection, spiritual discipline and study of sacred texts, and engaged action. They will experience an approach to ECO work which emphasizes creating and constructing structures of justice, in addition to countering or being "anti"-oppressions. The course will orient students to the school's educational values and the task of integrating the arts of ministry, the academic disciplines of theological and religious studies, and the professional and personal qualities needed in ministry. 
Please plan to enroll in the ECO Seminar, which takes place at Starr King on Wednesdays from 9:40am to 12:30pm and attend the ECO Workshops, also on Wednesdays, from 2:10pm to 5pm.  ECO Workshops will include films and discussion, interactive group work, additional art forms, and community building.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
STFT 4067 4.5 Units
Limit: No Limit    Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Approaches to Quranic Studies
Wednesdays, 2:10pm-5:00pm
Ghazala Anwar
This course will look at the spectrum of worldviews and systems of beliefs and assumptions within which the Quran is studied today.  In particular the sufi pietistic approach, the traditional and modern rationalist approach and the Western historical critical approach to the study of the Quran will be studied.  It shall delve into the question as to how each approach forecloses certain meanings while opening up other possibilities and how they might relate to each other or even be reconciled. It shall also explore the implications of historical critical study of the Quran for Muslim theology.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
HRBS 4827 3 Units
Minimum 3     Limit 20  Pin Required: Yes
Reading Room

Introduction to Theater of the Oppressed
Wednesdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Jiwon Chung
Theater of the Oppressed is a collection of games, techniques, exercises for using theater as a vehicle for personal and social change.  It is a method of harnessing the laboratory of the theater as a powerful tool for exploring power, transforming oppression, and finding community-building solutions to the problems of inequality, conflict and injustice. Based on the radical ideas of Paolo Freire and Augusto Boal, it is a collective artistic exploration into the fullest expression of our human dignity, potential and creativity. This full semester workshop will cover theory, application and facilitation of TO and will culminate in a one or more (interactive) forum theater pieces for the community. The workshop will be 80% experiential and 20% reflective/didactic. No prior theater experience is necessary.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
RSED 4036 3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 35  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Thursday 

Ethics at the movies, Ethics in Movies:  world-views, values and decision-making on and off screen.
Thursdays, 9:40am - 12:30pm
Gabriella Lettini
Through narratives, images and sound movies embody the complex, implicit and explicit values and decision-making processes that are part of the lives of individuals and communities. They are also the expressions of particular worldviews and the fruit of complex artistic, technical and economic decisions with deep ethical implications. This course will discuss movies as an important source for the academic study of ethics and offer tools for critical readings of the ethics of films. The movies chosen will focus on the interconnection of issues such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexualities, colonialism, class, economics, abilities, and religious and cultural diversity. Movies from underrepresented minorities and international movies will be preferred. The use of movies in community settings for theological and ethical reflection and grassroots activism will also be explored. Readings from the fields of ethics, theology and film studies. Assigned movies will be on reserve at the library and optional communal screenings will take place weekly on campus. Introductory classes in ethics preferred. Class limited to 15 people:  please write to instructor introducing yourself and motivating your reasons for taking the class.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
CERA 4022 3 Units
Minimum 8     Limit 15  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

Congregational Life and Administration
Thursdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Charla Weiss
*CANCELED*
Church administration and volunteer ministry is a science and an art.  As a science, church administration involves procedures and techniques that can be learned by study and by practice.  As an art, administration and working with volunteers calls for relational sensitivity, intuition and timing.  Learn how to create and monitor a church budget, how to work with accountants, bookkeepers and/or volunteer finance committees, how to navigate your compensation with the church, and other routine church finance activities.  Case studies, readings, observation, and discussion will inform students to the basics of church administration.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
FT 4071   3 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 30  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room
*CANCELED*

Sex & Spirit
Thursdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Charlie Glickman
If we want to bring our whole selves into connection with Spirit, we can’t forget our sexual selves. In this class, we will explore the effects of erotophobia on sexuality and, by extension, spirituality in order to discover how we can integrate these foundational aspects of our humanity. Some topics we will discuss include: sexual well-being, the effects of shame on relationships, sexual diversity, how our sexual selves can inform our spiritual practices, and the dance between boundaries and connection with others. The class will include lecture, interactive exercises, group discussion, and personal reflection in order to offer a range of perspectives and experiences.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
RARS 4031 3 Units
Minimum 8     Limit 25  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Unitarian Universalist Theologies: Modernity and Postmodernity
Thursdays, 7:10-9:40pm
Nada Velimirovic
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to distinctive theological perspectives present within Unitarian Universalist traditions and congregations, and to equip students to begin to think and write theologically in the context of post-modern religious communities and culture. Unitarian Universalism will serve as a case study in post-modern religious community and as a specific location for theological reflection. Especially oriented to students who identify as Unitarian Universalists, participants in this course will be encouraged to form a practice of engaged theological thinking within the context of Unitarian Universalism's particular perspectives, resources, limits and possibilities. Students who do not identify as Unitarian Universalists will be encouraged to become acquainted with this expression of American progressive post-Christian Protestantism as a site in which theological issues critical to post-modern religious community can be engaged.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
ST 4019   3 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 18  Pin Required: Yes
Reading Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Friday 

Crossroads of Community and Parish
Fridays, 9:40am - 12:30pm, September 10 through October 22
Carmen Barsody & Kay Jorgensen
Offsite
Using the model of Street Retreats, we will learn to raise a mirror of the Self up to the experience of witnessing to the commonalities of human suffering.  As we walk into the streets and other marginalized settings, we will explore relationships between ministry in community and parish. We will codify and reflect on their interdependence practically and theologically.  Class meets weekly in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco at the home of Faithful Fools Street Ministry, near the Civic Center, United Nation’s Plaza, and many social service agencies.  The Tenderloin District is an ethnically and economically diverse neighborhood that is marginalized in the city of San Francisco.  The Faithful Fools are an outreach of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of San Francisco and the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota.  Every student will be required to attend a Street Retreat and to choose a specific field-work assignment.  Class meets at the Faithful Fools Street Ministry, 234 Hyde Street in San Francisco.
FT 4058   1.5 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 30  Pin Required: No
Offsite

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Saturday 

No Saturday courses are scheduled at this time.

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
COMMUNITY AND PARISH FIELDWORK 

Community Fieldwork Fall
Gabriella Lettini
Community Fieldwork includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4060    1-5 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Community Internship Fall
Gabriella Lettini
Community Internships involve supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, literacy counseling and more. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Reflection Fall. Arrangements should be made with the professor.
View the course syllabus (pdf format).
FE 4220    5-10 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Community Intern Reflection Fall
Gabriella Lettini
All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class is designed to broaden and to deepen students' analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their ministerial and activist practices. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Arrange with Instructor. All participants will be expected to attend an intern gathering inn January, date TBA.
FE 4222    2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: No

MASC Project Fall
Gabriella Lettini
For SKSM Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change (MASC) students only.  MASC students should sign up for this class during the semesters when they are producing their final project representative of their learning during the program.  A copy of the project will be placed in a public collection at the school.
MA 5300    1-12 Units
Minimum 0 Limit: no limit     Pin Required: No

Congregational Fieldwork Fall
Kurt Kuhwald
Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations includes teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4050    1-5 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Parish Internship Fall
Kurt Kuhwald
This is a 6-10 month full-time or part-time experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship, an intern committee, and a professor at the school.  Those who register for this course should also register for Parish Intern Reflection Fall.
FE 4210    5-10 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Parish Intern Reflection Fall
Kurt Kuhwald
All Starr King students working as interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in this time of reflection on their ministerial work. All participants will be expected to attend the Starr King Intern Gathering for two days TBD in January, 2011.
FE 4212    2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Clinical Pastoral Education
Gabriella Lettini
This is for Starr King Students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent files.  Arrange with your advisor or the Director of Studies in Public Ministry.
FE 4012    1-10 Units

Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: No

In Thesis

TBA
Faculty
All Masters level students in the GTU community should use this designation if they are working on their thesis.
MA 5000         1-12 units
No Limit         No PIN Required

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

2010-2011
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

2009-2010 (archived course listings)
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

Click to view the Starr King catalog in PDF format. (Note: Seminary for the Laity certificate program is no longer offered.)

 

 


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