Fall 2009

2009-2010 Courses - Fall Semester

Updated: March 16, 2009

Early Registration: April 13-24, 2009
General Registration: August 31 - September 4, 2009

Early Registration is strongly advised.

Starr King Tuition and Course Fees.


Fall 2009

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

Online 

Anti-Oppression, Pastoral Care and Aging ~NEW!!~
Devorah Greenstein
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
This online course will explore the complexities of growing old in our contemporary United States. Course readings and discussion will include topics from the personal to the societal: from individual pastoral issues, to community involvement, to institutional and societal oppression. Using an analytic framework of ageism and its manifestations, we will study aging and: spiritual development; congregational support structures; pastoral relationships with caregivers and elders who have disabilities; implications of role changes (e.g. role loss associated with retirement); movement from independence to dependence/interdependence. We will seek strategies we can use to help elders successfully navigate these age-related changes. / The Rev. Dr. Devorah Greenstein serves the Unitarian Universalist Association as the Program Coordinator in the Office of Accessibility Concerns in the Identity-based Ministries staff group. In this capacity, she educates and provides resources for religious professionals, lay leaders, and other individuals and groups who are engaged in anti-racist, anti-oppressive, multicultural transformation work. She also develops resources and educates congregations, districts, and the UUA about how to confront institutional and cultural ageism, ableism, racism, classism, and heterosexism. Her educational training, which includes a a M.Div. from Starr King School for the Ministry; M.S. degree from Cornell University in Family Studies; Ph.D. from Cornell University in Developmental Psychology; and a M.S. degree from Syracuse University in Counseling, has given her a contextual theoretical perspective in which she grounds her anti-oppression work. Her work has always been along side of, and on behalf of, people from historically marginalized communities ~ at different times working with elder communities; farm-worker families; people with disabilities.
PS-8420           3 units
Minimum: 8      Limit: 20           PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009 ~NEW!!~
Course Closed: Late registration has ended


Multigenerational Ministries and Religious Education ~NEW!!~
Helen Bishop

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
According to the “Western,” European calendar, we are in the first decade of the 21st century. Other cultures and communities have different ways of measuring time, depending on the starting point, but most individuals agree that the life of an individual can be described in terms of a journey. In faith communities, people ranging in chronological age from a few days old to living in the 9th or 10th decade form a religious organization in which all stages of life are included. In this class, we will explore ways in which to make a full range of worship and educational experiences available, as well as structures and processes that add value to multigenerational experiences. References and examples of working to counter oppressions systemically are foundational to this course. / Dr. Helen Bishop holds an Ed.D in organizational leadership and has an extensive background working with Unitarian Universalist congregations, districts and affiliated organizations. She has designed, developed and taught online courses related to all aspects of lay leadership and congregational studies, including a pilot project for Unitarian Universalist lay leaders. She also served as director of The Mountain Learning Center for Leadership in Highlands, N.C., and as District Executive for Congregational Services for the UUA’s Central Midwest District. She received the Angus MacLean Award for Service to Religious Education in October, 2008.
ED-8464           3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 20         PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009  ~NEW!!~
Course Closed: Late registration has ended


Q
ueers (BGLTQ), Religion & Ministry
Vilius Rudra Dundzila

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
This online course explores queer theory, sexual orientation, and gender identity in religion and ministry. It studies the lives and theologies of bisexual, gay, lesbian, transgender and questioning (BGLTQ) people, their religious history, and their current situations. It focuses on the major western religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and includes Buddhism, Hinduism (Yoga), Paganism, and Native American traditions. It incorporates African American and Hispanic American religious experiences. ALL religious leaders will develop resources for ministry with BGLTQ congregants. BGLTQ people will explore their sexual orientation/gender identity impact on their ministries. The course will wrap up with broader conversations about inclusion, welcoming, sexuality, and pastoral care. Course requirements include weekly discussion forum postings and participation, an interview with the BGLT minister on their religious and ministerial journey, a mid-term short paper developing and defining queer theology for the student, and a longer final paper on the service of ministry with BGLT people. / Dr. Vilius Rudra Dundzila is a Unitarian Universalist minister in preliminary fellowship and Professor of Humanities and Comparative Religion for Harry S. Truman College (City Colleges of Chicago). He has conducted spiritual direction, groups, and retreats for Gay men. He currently serves as the director of the Illinois Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry.
ST-8450           3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15         PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

Unitarian Universalist History                        
Susan Ritchie
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
The course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We move on to trace the theological and then institutional emergence of Unitarianism out of the Radical Reformation. The Unitarian churches in Poland, Transylvania, and England will be considered in detail with attention to issues of sameness and difference in their development and declines. Special focus will be given to the relationship of these communities to their Jewish and Islamic contemporaries. We will also look at the universalism of 18th century England, and the current state of Unitarianism in Europe. Then we cross the ocean to examine the emergence of Unitarianism from developments within Puritan Congregationalism. We explore the uniquely North American institution of Universalism as response to the same cultural setting. Next:  the major themes and developments of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism (perhaps the most misunderstood aspect of Unitarian/Universalist history). Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances. / The Rev. Dr. Susan Ritchie has served as the minister of the North Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Lewis Center, Ohio since September of 1996. During that time, the congregation has more than doubled in size, purchased not only its first building but a religious education center, and added three professional staff positions. Ritchie is published widely on the topic of Unitarian Universalist history and identity, and also religious cultural studies. Her research demonstrating religious toleration to be an outgrowth of Islamic-Unitarian cultural exchange has been published in the Journal of Unitarian Universalist History, the Journal of the Zaytuna Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies, and has been republished in Turkish. Ritchie’s work on “The Promise of Postmodernism for Unitarian Universalist Theology” was published by the Journal of Liberal Religion, and was also translated into Hungarian.
HS-8423          3 units
Minimum: 8    Limit: 26          PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

Organizational Systems Thinking for Religious Leaders
Helen Bishop

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
This online course is designed to promote understanding among religious leaders of how organizations operate on the systems level. “Systems thinking” is a methodology linking understandings of how individuals, small and large groups of people interact with the structure, policies, practices, and culture of an organization. Participants will read materials on various aspects of organizational life, examine the ways in which components interact, discuss emotional and family systems theories and their implications for congregational systems, use systems analysis and thinking to investigate congregational leadership, analyze case studies for evidence of organizational frames, and prepare a case study demonstrating systems thinking. References and examples of working to counter oppressions are foundational to this course. / Dr. Helen Bishop holds an Ed.D in organizational leadership and has an extensive background working with Unitarian Universalist congregations, districts and affiliated organizations. She has designed, developed and taught online courses related to all aspects of lay leadership and congregational studies, including a pilot project for Unitarian Universalist lay leaders. She also served as director of The Mountain Learning Center for Leadership in Highlands, N.C., and as District Executive for Congregational Services for the UUA’s Central Midwest District. She received the Angus MacLean Award for Service to Religious Education in October, 2008.
FT-8404           3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 20         PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended


Contemporary Hinduism
Manish Mishra

Course Closed:
Late registration has ended
Arguably the world’s most ancient contemporary religion, tracing its roots back at least 3500 years, Hinduism is also the world’s third largest faith in practice today. It is an increasing segment of the American religious landscape, and many non-Hindu practitioners have found in it beliefs and spiritual disciplines that resonate with their own. This online course will provide a graduate-level survey of the Hindu faith, examining its history, theology, sacred texts, spiritual practices, social organization, and politics. / The Rev. Manish K. Mishra serves as Senior Minister of the Unitarian Universalist Church of St. Petersburg, Florida. He brings to his teaching a professional background in ministry, education, and diplomacy. He has previously taught religious studies at Northfield Mount Hermon School and Milton Academy. As a former American diplomat, Rev. Mishra has served in Oman and Finland, and at the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. He has been a member of the Unitarian Universalist Association’s Commission on Appraisal, the Editorial Board of Skinner House Books, and President of DRUUMM, the Unitarian Universalist people of color organization. Rev. Mishra holds a B.Sc. from Georgetown University, and a M.Div. from Harvard. As a Unitarian Universalist of Hindu origin, Rev. Mishra brings to Starr King a valuable perspective on the Hindu faith, its culture, and its people.
HR-8475         3 units
Minimum 8      Limit 20           PIN Required
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

Islam, Human Rights and Shariah
Ghazala Anwar

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
This course proposes to develop an Islamic concept of human rights and a concept of Shariah as a defender of human rights. It bases both human rights and Shariah law within the context of the spiritual development of a seeker unto God and investigates the interconnection of Shariah (law and ethics), Tariqa (personal intuitive discipline), Maarifa (intuitive knowledge of God) and Haqiqa (being in the presence of God). It includes a section on al-Asma ul-Husna (The ninety nine Beautiful Names or attributes of God) as elements of the quintessential theology that informs both the outer and inward existence of a Muslim. The topics discussed in the course include issues related to the rights of women and religious minorities, freedom of religion, freedom of conscience and sexual ethics. / Dr. Ghazala Anwar joined the Religious Studies programme at Canterbury in 2000 after teaching at a number of universities in the United States, including Temple University, where she completed her PhD in Religion in 1993. Prior to that she took her first MA in English Literature at Aligarh Muslim University in India, and her second MA in Humanities at the University of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests include Islamic jurisprudence and Sufism, as well as the exploration of issues of healing, gender and sexuality in Islam. She also participates frequently in national and international colloquia on interfaith dialogue and other current issues relating to Islam.
CEHR-8428     3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 40          PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended


Theological House: An Introduction to Theology for Unitarian Universalists
Holly Horn
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
Traversing the classical topics of systematic theology (the nature of God, humanity, Christ, Spirit, sin and salvation, and the purpose of the church), this course will introduce Unitarian Universalists and interested fellow travelers to the distinctive theological perspectives that give our theological house its shape and character. The course will include readings in the history of theology and contemporary sources, combined with online discussions and reflection papers. The goal is to deepen Unitarian Universalist theological competency and creativity in our emerging post-modern context. This course, developed by Starr King President and Professor of Theology Rebecca Parker, is open to Unitarian Universalist seminarians enrolled in schools outside the Graduate Theological Union, ministers, lay professionals and interested lay people. / The Rev. Dr. Holly Horn has served Unitarian Universalist congregations in Berkeley and Vallejo, CA, Collegeville and Philadelphia, PA as a parish minister. She has a Master of Divinity degree from Starr King School for the Ministry and a Ph.D. from the Graduate Theological Union. She is currently pursuing research for a book in feminist theology.
ST-8402           3 units       
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15          PIN Required
Click for Preliminary/Sample Syllabus
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

Tibetan Buddhism
Laura Harrington

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
TIBETAN UNDERSTANDINGS OF TANTRA. For centuries Tibet and Tibetan Buddhists have held an allure and mystique in the minds of westerners and others that is akin to that of the magical kingdom of Shangri-La. This seminar will explore both core philosophies and practices of Tibetan Buddhism as well as the ways in which Tibetan Buddhism has been mythologized by Tibetans and non-Tibetans alike. We will begin with a review of Indian Mahayana Buddhism, placing particular emphasis on Tantric thought and practices. Drawing on careful analyses of key histories, myths, poems, images, biographies and religious discourses, we will then focus on the subsequent development and core practices of Tibetan Buddhism’s key schools. In closing, we will consider the intersection of Buddhism and politics in the context of present day Tibet, exploring periodicals and literature to apply our insights to the analysis of contemporary realities. A summary reflection paper of approx. 20+ pages will be required at the end of the semester. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HR-8301          3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

Topics in Buddhist Traditions of the West: Globalization
Scott Mitchell

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
The rapid increase in global communication and commerce, tourism and migration, has had a profound impact on Buddhism in the modern era. This course will utilize globalization and transnationalism as methodological lenses with which to study the spread and development of Buddhist traditions in the modern era. We will focus primarily, though not exclusively, on Buddhisms in North America with an eye to how North American Buddhism is participating in, influenced by, and changing world-wide Buddhist trends. The course will be divided into three areas of study: (1) What is globalization? What is transnationalism?; (2) a survey of both historical and contemporary examples of globalized Buddhism; and (3) adaptations and consequences, or how globalization effects contemporary Buddhist thought and practice. This course fulfills the IBS “Buddhism in the West” or “Buddhism in America” requirement. Previous Buddhist Studies experience helpful but not required. Format: online course with weekly reading and reflection papers. Evaluation: Response papers, final research paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HR-8344         3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended
           

History of the Pure Land Tradition
Galen Amstutz

Course Closed: Late registration has ended
Devotion to Amitabha and Amitayu Buddhas originates in medieval India, and is an integral part of Mahayana religious culture. Today, such devotional practice forms one of the most popular forms of Buddhism, and is found in Tibet, China, Korea, Vietnam, Japan and the West. Course topics include the textual sources, major figures, and key institutions. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8350    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
Course Closed: Late registration has ended


 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 


Monday 

Preaching in Poverty: Oakland
9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Mondays                               
Kenneth Hamilton and Carol Johnson
The goal of this course is to help students reflect upon and witness to the prophetic potential of their preaching in the context of poverty and oppression. Students will have a chance to meet activists and ministers to discern with both them and their classmates on how to better preach in their various pastoral settings. The course will have three features: 1. fieldwork at a number of sites in Oakland that will focus on such issues as housing, prisons/jails, HIV, hunger, ecological justice, and youth outreach; 2. reflection, class discussions, and journaling around each experience; 3. a final project wherein students are asked to compose a sermon coming out of their course experience.
HMRS 4082    3 units
Minimum 12    Limit 15          PIN Required
Class meets at St. Mary’s Center for Aged Homeless
935 Brockhurst Street at San Pablo in Oakland, CA
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Religion and Ecology: Issues and Themes
2:10-5:00 p.m., Mondays
Tovis Page
As “worldviews” and “ways of life,” religious traditions mediate—for better or for worse—the relationship between human beings and the rest of the planetary community, including Earth’s ecosystems.  As such, they are integral to what Thomas Berry has called “the great work” of transforming socially and ecologically destructive systems into life-enhancing, just, and sustainable ones.  Using a variety of approaches (theological, anthropological, and sociological) and considering a range of religio-cultural traditions, this course addresses some of the critical issues and major themes constituting the emerging, interdisciplinary field of religion and ecology.
RS 4360          3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 20          No PIN Required       
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 

Tuesday 

Crossroads of Community and Parish
9:00-11:50 a.m., Tuesdays, September 8-October 20, 2009          
Carmen Barsody and Kay Jorgensen
Using the model of Street Retreats, we will learn to raise a mirror of the Self up to the experience of witnessing to the commonalities of human suffering.  As we walk into the streets and other marginalized settings, we will explore relationships between ministry in community and parish. We will codify and reflect on their interdependence practically and theologically.  Class meets weekly in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco at the home of Faithful Fools Street Ministry, near the Civic Center, United Nation’s Plaza, and many social service agencies.  The Tenderloin District is an ethnically and economically diverse neighborhood that is marginalized in the city of San Francisco.  The Faithful Fools are an outreach of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of San Francisco and the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota.  Every student will be required to attend a Street Retreat and to choose a specific field-work assignment. 
FT 4058           1.5 units
Minimum:  1    Limit:  30        PIN Required             
Class meets at the Faithful Fools Street Ministry
234 Hyde Street in San Francisco, CA.
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Spirituality and Nonviolent Social Transformation: Gandhi, King, Day and Chávez
2:10 – 5:00 p.m., Tuesday
Dorsey Blake
This course will explore the quests for justice through nonviolence of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day and César Chávez.  Critical to the course will be an emphasis on the connection between spirituality and social action.  What were the influences, e.g., Emerson, Thoreau, Tolstoy, DuBois, that helped shape the zeitgeist of their times?  How were strategies determined and employed?  What is essential to an effective nonviolent campaign?  What were the faith foundations of these extraordinary leaders?  What were their relationships to their communities?  How did they manage to keep their resolve in times of disappointments?  These are some of the questions the course will explore.
SPRS 4024      3 units                        
Minimum:  1    Limit: 20         PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

The Sacred and the Substance
7:10-9:40 p.m., Tuesdays
Ayize Jama-Everett
Taught not from a place of oppression or celebration, this course seeks to interrogate the history and current day uses of “drugs”.  Questioning not only the overarching category, this course will also examine how those who utilize drugs in their lives on a regular basis, from shamans to chaotic using addicts, are impacted psychologically, physically, and spiritually.  The quality and nature of drugs will also be examined in light of their prescribed benefits and risks.  We will be interrogating the history of Drug Laws in the United States from the Harrison Act to the current war on drugs, looking at the responses of drug utilizing communities, from A.A. to Harm reduction.  Through it all, we will be searching for the ways in which spirituality, religion, and faith are utilized by both sides.
RSPS 4291      3 units
Minimum 1      Limit 20          No PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 
Wednesday 

ECO/Threshold Seminar
9:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Wednesday, plus Weekly Discussion Groups, TBA                   
Rebecca Ann Parker, Core faculty and Student ECO Teaching Assistants
This foundational seminar, required of all entering Starr King M.Div. and MASC students, will introduce the eight threshold areas in which Starr King students must achieve competency before graduation, as well as Starr King School's educational practice of Educating to Counter Oppressions and Create Just and Sustainable Communities (ECO). Participants will learn and practice using tools of social and cultural analysis, self-critical analysis, and leadership in their personal spheres of influence. They will experience an approach to ECO work which emphasizes creating and constructing structures of justice, in addition to countering or being "anti"-oppressions. The course will orient students to the school's educational values and the task of integrating the arts of ministry, the academic disciplines of theological and religious studies, and the professional and personal qualities needed in ministry.  Weekly small group discussion sections will be arranged and led by advanced Starr King students serving as ECO Teaching Assistants.
STFT 4067                  4.5 units         
No Limit                     No PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Teacher and Prophet
2:10-5:00 p.m., Wednesdays
Michelle Favreault
The role of teaching in congregational and community settings is one of prophetic possibility and power. We will explore the art of teaching as a religious leader and experiment with forms, content and group process techniques.  This Advanced class will consider a postmodern critique of "small group work" or "student centered learning/teaching."  We will learn about and through multiple intelligences for learners of all ages. This will be a dynamic classroom that combines lectures, guided discussion, mentoring, apprenticeship and judiciously teaching one another. We will draw, eat, talk, write, take walks, watch films, take self-created impromptu field trips, sing, argue and move.
ED 4056          3 units            
Minimum:  1    Limit:  10        PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Introduction to American Neo-Paganism
7:10-9:40 p.m., Wednesdays                                                
Michael Walker
A foundational course in Pagan Studies, Introduction to American Neo-Paganism explores earth-based and feminist spiritualities, using terminology and concepts adopted from Jungian psychology. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of history, theology and practice of various forms of Pagan religion.  Assigned readings from texts, journals and the course reader, in dialogue with the lived experience of participants, will provide the basis for this course. Music, film and poetry of the peoples being studied will be offered, to honor the context from which they came. Classes will usually be a combination of presentation and discussion, with student evaluation based on participation and submission of three papers (one for each section of the course: History, Theology and Practice.)
HR 4044         3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 20          No PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 
Thursday 

The “Allergy to the Other”
9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Thursday                                                        
Gabriella Lettini
This advanced course will explore the claim that Western culture is characterized by an inability to think of the other as other, a tendency to erase otherness either by assimilation or by annihilation, which Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas—referring to the Western philosophical tradition—aptly defined as “allergy to the other.”  Using Levinas’ critique of the totalitarian aspects of Western thought as a starting point, this course will analyze how Western modern theo/alogies have reinforced or challenged the “allergy to the other.”  The authors analyzed are chosen for the prominence that issues surrounding otherness have in their work and represent a variety of perspectives, addressing issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality, abilities and religious, cultural and ethnic diversity.  Selected philosophical writings will be engaged, as patterns of identity construction and paradigms for non-hegemonic attitudes to otherness are explored.  Cinematic representations of the “other” will also enrich our work.
CEST 4138      3 units             
Minimum:  5     Limit:  15          PIN Required            
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Accompaniment as Spiritual Practice
2:10-5:00 p.m., Thursdays
Elliot Kukla
This course will focus on accompanying others through illness, grief, life transition, and dying.  We will use three approaches to build pastoral skills and to develop each student's self awareness and understanding of his/her spiritual experience of service: 1) We will develop a conceptual and liturgical framing for viewing accompaniment as a spiritual practice from Biblical and other classical sacred texts.  I will draw heavily on my own experiences as a rabbi and the use of Jewish sacred texts, and students will have the opportunity to develop their own theologies of care-giving based on their own traditions.  Additionally, we will work together on developing and adapting liturgy and ritual to accompany individuals, paying special attention to frequently neglected marginalized experiences of loss and transition such as recovery from addiction, aging, coming out and infertility.  2) We will use peer support and feedback to help students develop self-awareness about how they are personally impacted by accompanying individuals through loss and transition, and how they can best understand themselves in the service of others. Students will also have regular mentoring opportunities with spiritual leaders who have specialized training in providing spiritual care. 3) We will invite interdisciplinary leaders in health care as guest presenters to help students better understand how spiritual care fits in with other care-giving fields (such as psychology and social work) and feel better prepared to work  as spiritual care-givers in inter-disciplinary teams in a variety of settings and/or make referrals.  The over-arching goal of this course is to help individuals develop their own unique form of spiritual accompaniment that is sustaining to them as a spiritual practice and reflects their own experiences, identities, theologies, spiritual yearnings and pastoral style.  This course is offered in collaboration with the Bay Area Jewish Healing Center.
PS 4235           3 units
Minimum 7      Limit 20          No PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 
Friday 

Dismantling White Privilege in a Dying Patriarchy
9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Fridays 
Kurt A. Kuhwald
Drawing on work of white allies in the Unitarian Universalist Association, which in 1997 committed to becoming an anti-racist institution, this course will experientially and critically explore white identity and the construction, structure and transformation of white privilege within our current dying patriarchy. Special attention will be paid to the interlacing of personal and systemic racism as well as the profound dynamic/necessity of white accountability to People of Color.  There will be a particular focus on exploration and development of viable (and personal) psycho-theological processes for compassionate and effective transformation of white privilege and white racism both systemically and individually.
RS 4069           3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 25          PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

Listenaries
2:10-5:00 p.m., Fridays                                                                    
Daniel Thompson
A be kelen. All is One. Or is it? This working group will put together a book on religious experiences from around the world in relation to various World Scriptures. Encounters between religious groups have been marked by trauma of imposition by missionaries on host cultures. This course is a call for Listenaries to go whole-heartedly learn from the world’s lived religions. This task is critical today as fanatalist mono-theisms collide, ancient asceticisms are under massive materialist assault, and some of the last practitioners of smaller communities of worship perish forever from the earth one by one. This course is taught by a Starr King Teaching Fellow.
HRST 4249     3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 12          No PIN Required
Reading Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 
Saturday 

Sacred Chant as Spiritual Practice
10:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday, October 3, 2009                          
Shams Cohen
In listening, silence, and sound, participants reflect upon their experience with chants said to altar spiritual states and promote wholeness. We will chant from several world traditions and examine our relationships to them: Sufism, Confucianism, and Chinese and Tibetan Buddhism. Many of these chants are considered to be mind/body/spirit medicinals within their traditions. If time allows, we may also explore Kirtan, Neo-Pagan chants, Unitarian Universalist favorites, songs from the heart of the group, and/or some of my own hybrid originals. Please do not let negative ideas about your abilities keep you away. Students are encouraged to bring a journal and to purchase the 4 CD set, Sacred Chants, from the instructor in advance.  This intensive is being offered by a Starr King M.Div. student as part of their course of study. The intensive day itself is for 0 units.  Students wishing to receive credit for the course on their transcript will need to do additional work with their academic advisors on a write-up that clearly shows how the workshop enhanced their development as a religious leader.
RA 4084         0 units
Minimum: 1     Limit: 30         PIN Required
Fireside Room
Next Registration Period: August 31 - September 4, 2009. E-mail: registrar@sksm.edu

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

 
To Be Announced 

Community Fieldwork Fall
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
Community Fieldwork includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4060           1 to 5 units
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25          PIN Required  

Congregational Fieldwork Fall
TBA                                                                                       
Kurt A. Kuhwald
Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations includes teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and more. Please arrange with the professor.
 FE 4050           1 to 5 units      
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25       PIN Required  

Community Internship Fall
TBA                                                                                                   
Gabriella Lettini
Community Internships involve supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, literacy counseling and more. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Reflection Fall. Arrangements should be made with the professor.
FE 4220           5 to 10 units    
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25          PIN Required    

Community Intern Reflection Fall
TBA                                                                                                   
Gabriella Lettini
All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class is designed to broaden and to deepen students' analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their ministerial practice. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Arrange with Instructor. All participants will be expected to attend a gathering on January 27, 2010.
FE 4222           2 units             
Minimum:  1     Limit: 25           No PIN Required    

Clinical Pastoral Education
TBA                                                                                                   
Gabriella Lettini
This is for Starr King Students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent files.  Arrange with your advisor or the Director of Studies in Public Ministry.
FE 4012           1-10 units        
No Limit         No PIN Required    

Parish Internship Fall
TBA                                                                                       
Kurt Kuhwald
This is a 6-10 month full-time or part-time experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship, an intern committee, and a professor at the school.  Those who register for this course should also register for Parish Intern Reflection Fall.
FE 4210           5-10 units                    
Minimum:  1     Limit: 25        PIN Required

Parish Intern Reflection Fall
TBA                                                                                       
Kurt A. Kuhwald
All Starr King students working as interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in this time of reflection on their ministerial work. All participants will be expected to attend the Starr King Intern Gathering on January 26-27, 2010.
FE 4212           2 units             
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25       PIN Required

MASC Project
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
For SKSM Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change (MASC) students only.  MASC students should sign up for this class during the semesters when they are producing their final project representative of their learning during the program.  A copy of the project will be placed in a public collection at the school.
MA 5300         1-12 units        
No Limit         No PIN Required    

In Thesis

TBA
Faculty
All Masters level students in the GTU community should use this designation if they are working on their thesis.
MA 5000         1-12 units
No Limit         No PIN Required

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

2008-2009
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Saturday Intensives / Online

2009-2010
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

Click to view the Starr King catalog in PDF format. (Note: Seminary for the Laity certificate program is no longer offered.)

 

 


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